©2020 by BARZILAB. Designed by Moti Barzilay

UNDERSTANDING MECHANISMS OF RISK AND RESILIENCE THROUGHOUT BRAIN DEVELOPMENT

 

THE CHALLENGES THAT DRIVE OUR WORK

  • To understand why some youths who grow up with developmental stress become suicidal, while others are not (resilient).

  • To timely identify those at risk for serious psychopathology and divert the developmental trajectory from risk to resilience.

THE QUESTIONS WE ASK

  • What are the mechanisms that drive variability in the development of brain and behavior? 

  • How do environmental (E) exposures (e.g., trauma, neighborhood environment) interact among themselves (E X E), and with biological (e.g., genetic (G)) factors (G X E), to shape developmental trajectories of youth?

OUR VISION

Promote resilience and prevent suicide and serious psychiatric outcomes in youths.

OUR MISSION

Conduct impactful translational science aimed at reducing youth mental health burden.

 

OUR RESEARCH

In BarziLab, we use multiple methods to understand variability in the development of brain and behavior.

We study how a myriad of environmental exposures (such as trauma and socioeconomic factors) dynamically interact among themselves, and with biological factors (such as genetic and epigenetic) to shape the development of brain and behavior.

 

OUR VALUES

We collect and analyze large human datasets.

We do collaborative interdisciplinary science.
We work with basic scientists to inform mechanistic gaps that can only be investigated in animal models.

 

OUR APPROACH

CONDUCT LONGITUDINAL STUDIES

BarziLab studies at-risk youths throughout development in attempt to elucidate the immune mechanisms associated with risk and resilience to developmental stress.

ANALYSE EXISTING LARGE-SCALE INFORMATIVE DATASETS

BarziLab uses available human datasets that can inform on the factors (features) that drive risk and resilience. We are specifically interested in integrating data from multiple levels of environmental exposures (exposome) with large scale biological data (e.g., genomics, imaging) and other available data sources (such as electronic health records) in order to better understand complex mechanisms of development and to allow prediction of adverse behavioural outcomes such as suicidal behavior.

 

SELECTED PROJECTS

 
OCS PREDICTIVE.JPG

Identifying subclinical behaviors as markers for serious psychopathology risk

OUR TEAM

RAN BARZILAY

PI

Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Passionate about impactful science that improves the lives of children and adolescents, reduces mental health burden and prevents suicide.

GRACE DIDOMENICO

Lab Manager

The “chief of operations” of Barzi.lab. Runs the clinical studies, manages the databases, coordinates collaborations. Passionate about making an impact in youth mental health research.

ELINA VISOKI

Data Analyst

Software engineer with a Master degree in data science. Transitioning from industry to academia to make an impact on the field of suicide research.

 

COLLABORATORS

We aim to solve complicated challenges that require a multidisciplinary team of clinicians,

data scientists, geneticists, immunologists, developmental psychologists, basic neuroscientists and computational biologists.

TYLER MOORE, PhD

University of Pennsylvania-

Stats and psychometrics

VARUN WARRIER, PhD

University of Cambridge-

Genetics of complex traits

AARON ALEXANDER BLOCH, MD PhD

University of Pennsylvania- Neuroimaging

FUCHIANG (RICH) TSUI, PhD

University of Pennsylvania- Clinical Informatics

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Barzilay R, Lawrence GM, Berliner A, Gur RE, Leventer-Roberts M, Weizman A, Feldman B. (2019). Association between prenatal exposure to a 1-month period of repeated rocket attacks and neuropsychiatric outcomes up through age 9: a retrospective cohort study. European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. In press.

Barzilay R, Calkins ME, Moore TM, Boyd RC, Jones JD, Benton T, Oquendo MA, Gur RC, Gur RE. (2019). Neurocognitive functioning in community youth with suicidal ideation: gender and pubertal effects. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 215 (3), 552-558.

Featured in Medscape:  “Youth suicidal ideation does not suggest lower intelligence”.https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/911705

Barzilay R, Calkins ME, Moore TM, Wolf DH, Satterthwaite TD, Scott JC, Jones JD, Benton TD, Gur RC, Gur RE. (2019). Association between traumatic stress load, psychopathology and cognition in the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort. Psychological Medicine, 49(2), 325-334.

Barzilay R, Patrick AM, Calkins ME, Moore TM, Wolf DH, Benton TD, Leckman JF, Gur RC, Gur RE. (2019). Obsessive compulsive symptomatology in community youth: Typical development or a red flag for psychopathology? Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 58(2), 277-286.

Featured in Medscape: “OCS symptoms and risk of psychopathology”. https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/908230  

Barzilay R, Patrick AM, Calkins ME, Moore TM, Gur RC, Gur RE. (2019). Association between early-life trauma and obsessive compulsive symptoms in community youth. Depression and Anxiety, 36(7),586-595.
 

EXCITED ABOUT WHAT WE DO?

JOIN THE BarziILab